Paganism and the Church (part three)

Paganism and the Church (part three)

There is a character who happens to be a wizard named Gandalf the Grey, later becoming Gandalf the White, who appears in the series of writings by J.R.R Tolkien, The Hobbit, and The Lord of the Rings series.  Gandalf is described to be a long-bearded fellow dressed in grey, later white, and carrying a staff. i was looking at photos today of Odin the Germanic pagan god, and thought, “wow, now there are some similarities here!” Could we begin to draw similarities between everything and in so doing, make everything sacred or everything unholy depending on our take? Yes, we could, and yes, we have, in many instances, on many topics. This is the main reason that i want to be very careful as we tred into custom, tradition, holiday’s, and paganism. i don’t want to lead anyone into confusion or misunderstanding, but in everything, cause you, the reader, to think critically and examine Scripture thoroughly.

Last week we talked about the history and timing of Christmas as it relates to pagan traditions, Saturnalia, Yule, and Egyptian sun god worship. There is a figure that each of these traditions has that have surprising similarities. In fact, build upon each other within the ongoing mixing of many of these celebrations. Most notably or recognizable in our current culture, we know him as Santa Clause. No need to dive into who he is or the tradition surrounding him. However, our present Santa is an evolutionary being, drawn from the mixing of cultures throughout time. Chiefly, Saint Nicholas, Sinterklaas, Father Christmas, Kris Kringle, and Odin.

Is Santa just a fun cultural icon who is only one of many characters within the secularization of the Christmas holiday? Or, is he a well placed pagan influence, put there purposefully by the prince and ruler of this world? Well, i will be the first to admit that i have always looked at Santa as just a fun cultural icon of the secular side of Christmas. i even have a costume, dressing up as Santa, i have placed gifts under the tree.  You could say it has been a tradition also as the kids have gotten older. They certainly know that it is me, they even know what they are getting, nerf guns. It’s the same every year, and everyone opens them at the same time, and then, traditionally, an epic battle ensues. Is this a pagan tradition? Are we worshiping Odin? i can unequivocally say, no, we are not.

However, with that being said, now that i know how this cultural icon has evolved, can i continue with a clear conscience? Can i continue to celebrate the birth of Jesus along the same lines as an ever-evolving holiday tradition we know as “Christmas?” The answer to that is also, no, i can not. If i want to celebrate within culture a holiday tradition i certainly am free to do so. Even still once i cross the line or blur the line of worshiping Jesus, my Lord, and Saviour, and use elements that are known by me and everyone else to have pagan history and influence, i am compelled by what i read in Scripture to stop.

And he did what was right in the eyes of the Lord, according to all that David his father had done. He removed the high places and broke the pillars and cut down the Asherah. And he broke in pieces the bronze serpent that Moses had made, for until those days the people of Israel had made offerings to it (it was called Nehushtan). He trusted in the Lord, the God of Israel, so that there was none like him among all the kings of Judah after him, nor among those who were before him. For he held fast to the Lord. He did not depart from following him, but kept the commandments that the Lord commanded Moses. And the Lord was with him; wherever he went out he prospered. He rebelled against the king of Assyria and would not serve him.” 2 Kings 18:3-7

Notice here that King Hezekiah, to honor God, destroyed all the high places. The “high places” is another term for “holy” sights or places of pagan worship. He broke down the Asherah, again pagan symbols of worship and even the serpent that Moses was instructed by God to make when the children of Israel were being tormented by the serpents in the desert. You see, the Israelites took something God used for good and began to worship it as a god. We can and have done the same thing within the Christian culture. We have taken things God created for our good and have worshiped them instead of God. We need to be as bold as King Hezekiah and begin to tear down those things that we have elevated or given special honor over Jesus in our worship, through worship that is tainted by pagan cultural influences.

Do you have high places that you have built up? Have you set up Asherah poles or other forms of pagan worship within your worship of God? If so, tear them down! And do it now, and do it quickly! God does not want your pagan influenced religion. He wants you to seek Him with your whole heart, soul, mind, and strength. He desires to be worshiped in spirit and in truth, untainted by the world.

You are loved,

cj